Category Archives: Thoughts and feelings

Goodbye 2014.

This shall be my last post for 2014. I hope you, as I, shall take some time to reflect on the year that has passed (all too quickly it seems). Think about the events that transpired. Relive the joyous highlights and learn from the despondent lowlights.

I have had a very eventful year. My blog does not reflect that – as this habit has been newly formed in the later part of the year – but it has been a doozie as years go. I will share these events – as a narrative – in future blog posts. Just as a teaser – it involves me getting fired from my job. As the adventure that transpired next will attest – that was a happy ending!

I spend this time of the year in deep and critical introspection. What did I do – what could I have done differently? Who were the people who made a difference in my life? What events – good or bad – occurred, and why – and what have they taught me? Where have I come from – and where am I headed? I find that this is a useful exercise in gratitude and self-improvement.

I generally make resolutions, and I will no doubt make some this year. But my resolutions this year will be a little different in light of the year gone by. If you are looking to make resolutions, try to make them specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time bound (SMART). Here’s some more reading around the science of goal setting.

Everything happens for the best. This may not always be obvious, or apparent, but I have found it to be generally true. If you have had a tough year, I hope you will think about it in this light. If you find yourself in especially dark and trying times, all I can tell you is to be strong – for the tough times do pass – and leave you with an appreciation of a deep inner strength that you never knew you possessed – and the recognition of those that truly love you – for they are the ones that will have stood by you.

I can’t wait to see what 2015 has in store for me. I wish you, dear reader, the very best that life has to offer. Talk soon…

Why Pakistan’s response to the Peshawar tragedy is questionable

I have commented before on this tragedy. As the world mourned the loss of 132 children in a school shooting by the Pakistani Taliban group, there was unanimous demand for swift justice. Pakistani officials announced that they were lifting the moratorium on capital punishment for terrorists indicating that hundreds of terrorists would be executed. However, we then heard of the news that the chief accused in the Mumbai terror attacks, Zaki ur Rehman Lakhvi (a member of the terror group Lashkar-e-Taiba), was released on bail. This seems to be in direct contrast to their proclaimed fight against terrorism.

A friend of mine forwarded me this point of view in which C. Christine Fair provides insight into the contributing factors for the tragedy, why Pakistan’s sound bytes are in direct contrast to their actions and why this may be a tough issue to resolve. What are your thoughts on this?

A heartbreaking tragedy in Pakistan

The smallest coffins are the heaviest.

Today I checked my daily email from FT and came across the shooting that occurred in a Pakistani school where 141 people – including 132 children – were killed by Taliban terrorists.

I feel devastated by this. To imagine that these kids left home today after praying for success in their exams, and being wished well for it by their families and then through unseen turn of events being killed senselessly by terrorists for no apparent reason is heartbreaking to say the least. It is hard to imagine that there is any reasonable cause for such an action. If these actions were committed in the name of religion, then I would struggle to believe that any religion permits or looks favorably on the murder of innocents. Political motives make no sense when it comes to the mass murder of children who weren’t even yet of voting age. This was incomprehensible in every way.

I cannot imagine the loss and the pain being experienced by the families that lost near and dear ones. I can’t put myself in their shoes – to do so would mean imagining this happening to me. And I don’t know what I would do if something like this happened to my children or loved ones.

Pakistan – and the world at large – need to now go about mourning this event and picking themselves up from this tragedy – no matter how hard that may seem. And then they need to pursue these terrorists to the ends of the earth and purge them. This will, I am certain, provide no solace to those that have suffered loss – but will hopefully prevent more of such insane acts in the future.

You may fall on the pacifist side of this argument, and quote that an eye for an eye will make the whole world blind. I would urge you to really put yourself in the place of the parents that lost children – imagine for a moment if this were your only child. Would you still say that it is OK to not pursue the organization that perpetrated this crime and eliminate them? Not because it would fill the hole where your heart used to be – but to prevent a hole in another parent’s heart. What argument would you have if such a heinous crime were to recur – but only because swift and lethal action were deferred in lieu of humane treatment of the animals that inflicted this horror? What if the next time, it were one of your own?

No one deserves the pain these families are going through. And those children did not deserve to die. The people behind the act, however, surely do.

Today I am heartbroken. My – and indeed the world’s – thoughts and prayers are with the families of those departed.